The grails diaries #5: Do you need a software architect?

Tweet Previous: Grails, is it really worth it? I think there is a general misunderstanding of what kind of value can give Grails to a development shop. It seems that there are people out there that believe Grails, RoR and other breeds mean the end of Software Architectures in the web layer. The reasoning is: if the workload to develop a web application is shorter probably it means we need less skilled developers to code our applications.…

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Google Chart API or how Google gives raw performance for free

Tweet If you dont’ understand why Google is giving for free this API, where is the value of this action, then you probably have never tried to render a chart on the server side. It’s one of the most CPU intensive actions a server side solution can have. If you don’t size and distruibute your apps properly, your site can colapse with a single impatient user clicking quickly a link several times or reloading a page because it takes more time than usual to render.…

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The ball and chain of iPhone was not Java: it’s Google Android

Tweet Sometimes you only need to wait to understand why things happen. When Steve Jobs said ‘Java is not worth building in. Nobody uses Java anymore. It’s this big heavyweight ball and chain’, we were surprised and disappointed because like me a lot of people think that there is still room for Java in the mobile platforms. Of course we have J2ME, but we can do very few things with it.…

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Amazon S3 for europeans: Bye bye latency issues

Tweet Werner Vogels -the Amazon CTO- has just announced in his blog the availability of the S3 storage for Amazon European servers. This is good news because it means that Amazon thinks globally. The customer experience can improve if the latency is very low because of the fastest load of pages and static content.…

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Leaving AMPLIA and starting as a Freelance IT Consultant

Tweet Last years have been a wonderful time in Amplía Soluciones S.L., but nothing is forever and I think it’s time for a change. I will continue as a partner of the company but I will look for new challenges and adventures out there. You can read my public linkedin profile if you want to know a bit about my skills and experience.…

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Rise and fall of DBAs: The tyranny of the ORM

Tweet There was a time when DBAs dictate how developers should use Their databases. It was early and mid-nineties and Their Word was The Truth. Those poor guys building client-server applications had to bow down before Him/Her and implement the Business Logic inside The Database Manager. Database hardware was expensive, but His/Her Highness could size the system easily because the number of clients connected was predictable. And that’s what the IT Manager wanted; predictable figures.…

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Why developers hate bug-fixing

Tweet Probably the only common thing among all developers I have worked with is the hate to bug-fixing. No matter if bugs belong to them or not. As a developer and as a manager I have quite contradictory feelings. As a developer there was nothing more irritating than the hateful Bugzilla emails. When I was working as Technical Lead of a development team in Madrid with a QA team in the West Coast of USA they usually started to work at our 18:00 and we usually left at 19:00 (Madrid is GMT+2 summer time).…

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Data normalization is not for sissies, it’s just common sense

Tweet And I must be the biggest sissy of all. There is a lot of buzz{#ddz7} about designing your databases thinking in data normalized or denormalized. Now that everybody is building the next Google or YouTube the database design has to support trillions of transactions per second and millions of terabytes, of course running on a multidimensional computing grid of zillions of nodes of databases written in Erlang……

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